Tag Archive: council of Nicaea


Vatican Obelisk


Vatican Obelisk.

In 1586, the Italian engineer Domenico Fontana moved an Egyptian obelisk to its present site in front of the Vatican in St. Peter’s Square. The obelisk, quarried in Egypt during the 13th century BC, was brought to Rome in the 1st century.  It remained in position until Pope Sixtus V, as part of his plan to continue the construction of St. Peter’s and make it one of the world’s truly spectacular buildings, recommended moving the obelisk 275 yards from its original Roman site to the featured location in front of the Vatican.

Fontana’s plan for moving the obelisk was chosen from among hundreds of others. It relied heavily on pulleys, some as large as five feet in length, to lift the obelisk off its base and then lower it to a horizontal position by pivoting it on its lower end. Five huge levers, each 51 feet long, were used to help lift the shaft off the base. A variety of pulley blocks were required to work in conjunction with the 40 winches, each of which were powered with horses and men to supply the main lifting force. It took Fontana one year to complete the task. On September 28, 1586, the scaffolding and tower had been removed. The obelisk appeared in full view, in the same position as it appears today more than 400 years later.

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Monday, March 8, 2010, 1:42 PM
Joe Carter

On his radio program, Fox News’ Glenn Beck encouraged listeners to leave their church if it proclaims a concern for social justice:

I’m begging you, your right to religion and freedom to exercise religion and read all of the passages of the Bible as you want to read them and as your church wants to preach them . . . are going to come under the ropes in the next year. If it lasts that long it will be the next year. I beg you, look for the words ’social justice’ or ‘economic justice’ on your church Web site. If you find it, run as fast as you can. Social justice and economic justice, they are code words. Now, am I advising people to leave their church? Yes!”

Listen to the audio here.

click for source

Although many Protestant denomination express concerns about social justice, the term is most closely associated with the social teachings of the Catholic Church. A Jesuit priest, Luigi Taparelli D’Azeglio, coined the term in the 1840s and based the concept on the teachings of Thomas Aquinas.

According to the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, “a large part of the Church’s social teaching is solicited and determined by important social questions, to which social justice is the proper answer.” Social justice is even given a section in the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Gutenberg

Ebook.com

early Christian Catena

early Christian writings

The Corpus Hermeticum

The Complete Sayings of Jesus

by Arthur Hinds[1927]

Like the Jefferson Bible, this is an attempt to edit the four gospels into a consistent account, in this case focusing on the words of Jesus. There is plenty of connecting narrative around the instances where Jesus speaks, so this is better than simply presenting each quote out of context. The focus on what Jesus is attributed as saying makes it easier to browse the core texts of the New Testament. All in all, a very useful reference, and a great read.

Freemasonry

The Internet has long been home to all kinds of sites about Freemasonry, pro and con. However, it has been hard to find reliable, vetted information on the web on this topic. This page has electronic editions of core texts on Freemasonry in the public domain, presented complete and unaltered.

The community of Christian etext redactors is very active, and transcriptions of public domain books on the topic are abundant. The following are archives of public domain etexts about Christianity and related topics, which contain much more material than we have room or bandwidth for at this site. Some of these are:

Christian Classics Ethereal Library This is probably the largest general purpose archive of Christian texts.
Additional Early Church Fathers at the Tertullian Project website. This dovetails with the ‘Early Church Fathers’ collection at CCEL.
The Unbound Bible has the best collection of downloadable Bible data files anywhere. Highly recommended.
Digital Christian Library and related topics, with many unique items, by a very active scanner who has
The Gnostic Society A collection of shorter texts on Gnosticism. Also has a collection of Dead Sea Scroll translations.
The Catholic Encyclopeda This is a project to put online this huge work from 1913.

<!– Project Wittenberg A comprehensive archive of Lutheran texts, of general interest for the study of Protestantism.
–>Quaker Heritage Press publishes etexts of rare and out-of-print Quaker documents.
Restoration Movement Texts. Primary texts of a 19th century American religious movement, predecessor of Churches of Christ, the Christian Churches, and the Disciples of Christ, among other groups.

Father Malachi Martin – Paranet – 07 & 14-Jul-1996.mp3 (7.7 MB) (Modified: Jun 28 2006 04:15:30 AM)

Father Malachi Martin – Paranet – 12-Jul-1997.mp3 (3.4 MB) (Modified: Jul 14 2006 09:21:00 AM)

Father Malachi Martin – Paranet – 19-Jul-1997.mp3 (2.9 MB) (Modified: Jul 14 2006 09:06:26 AM)

Malachi Martin and the Crisis in the Catholic Church since 1958

http://www.mikepiperreport.com/ — and his radio archive is here: http://republicbroadcasting.org/get_archive.php?hn=Piper&yr=07 )

First link to this January 18, 2007 radio show about Malachi Martin and the crisis in the Catholic Church:
http://216.240.133.177/Piper/07/01/Piper_011807_000000.mp3 (date of interview: Jan 18, 2007)

Second link to this January 18, 2007 radio show about Malachi Martin and the crisis in the Catholic Church:
Michael Collins Piper and Jim Condit Jr. discuss a chapter in Piper’s book, The Judas Goats, which deals with the late, double agent Malachi Martin and the subversion of the Roman Catholic Church since 1958. Piper is the only author since 1958 to treat this subject in a whole chapter in a major book from the correct angle. Also, the attack by the Southern Poverty Law Institute against twelve Catholic organizations, which happened one day earlier, is discussed. (The date of the interview is January 18, 2007)

taken from

The    Truth 247        

SECTION TWO: The Crisis in the Roman Catholic Church since 1958

http://www.thetruth247.com/audios_conditjr.htm

Malachi Martin and the Crisis in the Catholic Church since 1958

wait a minute that looked like anti Malachi Martin stuff, wait a minute

The special guest on the January 18 edition of Michael Collins Piper’s nightly forum on the Republic Broadcasting Network at rbnlive.com was veteran political activist and Traditionalist Catholic James Condit, Jr. Condit joined Piper to discuss the outrageous intrigues of the late Father Malachi Martin who was the subject of a chapter in Piper’s new book, THE JUDAS GOATS, which analyzes Zionist infiltration of the American nationalist movement and which detailed (based on Condit’s research and that of others) the little-known story of how Father Martin, a priest working high up in the Vatican, acted as an agent of Zionist interests during the Vatican II “reform” conference of the early 1960s bending the doctrines of the Catholic Church to accord with the demands of the Zionist interests. Amazingly, Martin later was annointed by the Zionist-controlled mass media as a”critic” of the very so-called “reforms” that he had helped bring about at the direction of his Zionist handlers. Piper and Condit pointed out that the first evidence of Zionist infiltration of the Vatican came in a LOOK magazine article in 1966 entitled “How the Jews Changed Catholic Thinking.” However, LOOK did not identify Martin as the Zionist agent. It did mention, though, that the Zionist agent had written a book under a pseudonym, “Michael Serafian.” It was some years later that that pseudonym was revealed to be a pen-name for none other than Malachi Martin. So there is no question that Martin was a Zionist agent. Just recently, Condit pointed out, the depraved pro-Zionist Southern Poverty Law Center of Morris Dees, which acts as an adjunct of the Zionist Anti-Defamation League, had published a broadside attacking traditionalist Catholic organizations that have been critical of Zionism and of its role in warping traditional,historic, ancient original Catholic Church doctrine. In other Piper noted that Father Martin, during his final days, was active in financing an organization, the Institute for Historical Review (IHR), that had, itself been infiltrated from within, and then used to destroy Liberty Lobby, the longtime Washington populist Institution that published The SPOTLIGHT newspaper for which Piper wrote for many years. Piper himself learned of Martin’s financial support for the IHR from a press release issued by Mark Weber of the IHR following Martin’s death in which Weber bragged of Martin’s secret backing of the IHR during the time that it was being used to attack Liberty Lobby. Later Weber pulled that information about Martin’s backing of the IHR from the IHR website apparently after having been tipped off that Piper was preparing to blow the whistle on Martin’s Zionist connections, based on material published by Lawrence T. Patterson of CRIMINAL POLITICS magazine. In fact, it was Piper’s guest, James Condit Jr., who had been involved in preparing the expose of Martin’s role as a “priest-spy for Zionism” inside the Vatican. Piper noted also that Martin’s close friend, pro-Zionist former CIA agent William F. Buckley, Jr. and Buckley’s own former CIA colleague, E. Howard Hunt, had waged two unsuccessful lawsuits to destroy Liberty Lobby only to have their efforts derailed by outspoken anti-Zionist attorney Mark Lane. Later, the intriguers regrouped and under the direction of yet another CIA figure, Andrew Allen, took over the IHR and used it to destroy Liberty Lobby in yet another lawsuit that succeeded in bankrupting Liberty Lobby. So it was a known Zionist agent, Malachi Martin, who was collaborating with those who destroyed Liberty Lobby. In any case, Piper’s guest, Condit, pointed that the story of how the Vatican has been undermined from within has parallels to the same way that similar Zionist water-carriers inside the Protestant churches—such as Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson—have also engaged in similar intrigues. The lessons of the dangers of such “Judas Goats” need to be examined in detail in order to understand how the Zionists engage in hard-core political wrecking operations designed to undercut all forms of Christian religions, yesterday and today. For more about the topic of the infiltration of the Catholic Church by Zionism, see the Internet website october1958.com. Jim Condit Jr.’s website can be accessed at thetruth247.com or you may write: Jim Condit, PO Box 11555, Cincinnati, Ohio 45211.

Wow Malachi Martin a double agent? (possible heretical/disinfo) stuff on this site WARNING)

Say it aint so Joe, Say it aint so


Before Luther nailed those papers to the door, before King James, and even from before the Council of Nicaea;  one of the first great divides of Christianity seems to be the Arian Controversies

The early history of the controversy must be pieced together from about 35 documents found in various sources. The historian Socrates of Constantinople reports that Arius first became controversial under the bishop Achillas of Alexandria, when he made the following syllogism: he said, “If the Father begat the Son, he that was begotten had a beginning of existence: and from this it is evident, that there was a time when the Son was not. It therefore necessarily follows, that he had his substance from nothing”.

Bishop Alexander of Alexandria was criticised for his slow reaction against Arius. Like his predecessor Dionysius, he has been charged with vacillation. The question that Arius raised had been left unsettled two generations previously. Therefore Alexander allowed the controversy to continue until he felt that it had become dangerous to the peace of the Church. Then he called a council of bishops and sought their advice. Once they decided against Arius, Alexander delayed no longer. He deposed Arius from his office, and excommunicated both him and his supporters.

Further information: Synods of Antioch

Origen, (d. 251) used ousia in defining God as one genus of ousia, while being three, distinct species of hypostasis: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. The Synods of Antioch condemned the word homoousios (same substance) because it originated in pagan Greek philosophy. The Paul of Samosata entry of the Catholic Encyclopedia says:

It must be regarded as certain that the council, which condemned Paul, rejected the term homoousios; but, naturally, only in a false sense, used by Paul; not, it seems, because he meant by it a unity of Hypostasis in the Trinity (so St. Hilary), but because he intended, by it, a common substance, out of which both Father and Son proceeded, or which it divided between them — so St. Basil and St. Athanasius; but the question is not clear. The objectors to the Nicene doctrine in the fourth century made copious use of this disapproval of the Nicene word by a famous council.[3]

The general agreed upon meaning of ousia in Eastern Christianity is all that subsist by itself and which has not its being in another.[4] In contrast to hypostasis which is used to mean reality or existence.[5]

In 325, the First Council of Nicaea condemned Arianism and formulated a creed, which stated that in the Godhead the Son wasHomoousios (same in substance) of the Father. However, controversy did not stop and many Eastern clerics rejected the term because of its earlier condemnation in the usage of Paul of Samosata. Subsequent Emperors Constantius II and Valens supported Arianism and theologians came up with alternative wordings like Homoios (similar) homoiousios (similar in substance), or Anomoios (unsimilar). While the Homoios achieved the support of several councils and the Emperors, those of an opposing view were suppressed. The adherents of the Homoiousios eventually joined forces with the (mostly Western) adherents of the Homoousios and accepted the formulation of theNicene creed.

yes, i couldn’t Saint Isidore of Seville Sanctus Isidorus Hispalensis believe it myself, but here it is The Patron Saint of the internet

Saint Isidore of Seville Sanctus Isidorus Hispalensis

Catholic online has the prayer  you need to say before logging online:

Almighty and eternal God,
who created us in Thy image and bade us to seek after all that is good,
true and beautiful,
especially in the divine person of Thy only-begotten Son,
our Lord Jesus Christ,
grant we beseech Thee that,
through the intercession of Saint Isidore,
bishop and doctor,
during our journeys through the internet we will direct our hands and eyes only to that which is pleasing to Thee
and treat with charity and patience all those souls whom we encounter.
Through Christ our Lord.
Amen

I’m going to dig into this one a little more before I form an opinion, it is just a proposed saint, not official but i do like to say i dig the prayer, it’s pretty close, i might have some suggestions before this is all made official…         stayed tuned, i’m off to research this

ok this might be my new favorite blog it has a great post on Isidorus

totally legit guy for patron saint type status and I can actually see why you’d use him for the internet

for one he made an encyclopedia that what used in schools

he was  a pretty cool brainiac knowledge cataloguer, internet all the way.

he evidently suffered abuse from his older brother who is also saint

One day, the young boy couldn’t take any more. Frustrated by his inability to learn as fast as his brother wanted and hurt by his brother’s treatment, Isidore ran away. But though he could escape his brother’s hand and words, he couldn’t escape his own feeling of failure and rejection. When he finally let the outside world catch his attention, he noticed water dripping on the rock near where he sat. The drops of water that fell repeatedly carried no force and seemed to have no effect on the solid stone. And yet he saw that over time, the water drops had worn holes in the rock.

Isidore realized that if he kept working at his studies, his seemingly small efforts would eventually pay off in great learning. He also may have hoped that his efforts would also wear down the rock of his brother’s heart.

When he returned home, however, his brother in exasperation confined him to a cell (probably in a monastery) to complete his studies, not believing that he wouldn’t run away again.

So he toiled away in a little room studying.  Soaking in information in a little box, totally relate that to the interweb.

His encyclopedia of knowledge, the Etymologies, was a popular textbook for nine centuries. He also wrote books on grammar, astronomy, geography, history, and biography as well as theology. When the Arabs brought study of Aristotle back to Europe, this was nothing new to Spain because Isidore’s open mind had already reintroduced the philosopher to students there.

see, makes sense, he’s all about knowledge

lets look into this abusive brother shall we….

St. Leander of Seville, Bishop (Feast – February 27th) Leander was born at Cartagena, Spain, of Severianus and Theodora, illustrious for their virtue. St. Isidore and Fulgentius, bothbishops were his brothers, and his sister, Florentina, is also numbered among the saints. He became a monk at Sevilleand then the bishop of the See. He was instrumental in converting the two sons Hermenegild and Reccared of the Arian Visigothic King Leovigild. This action earned him the kings’s wrath and exile to Constantinople, where he met and became close friends of the Papal Legate, the future Pope Gregory the Great. It was Leander who suggested that Gregory write the famous commentary on the Book of Jobcalled the Moralia. Once back home, under King Reccared, St. Leander began his life work of propagating Christian orthodoxy against the Arians in Spain. The third local Council of Toledo (over which he presided in 589) decreed the consubstantiality of the three Persons of the Trinity and brought about moral reforms. Leander’s unerring wisdom and unflagging dedication let the Visigoths and the Suevi back to the true Faith and obtained the gratitude of Gregory the Great. The saintly bishop also composed an influential Rule for nuns and was the first to introduce the Nicene Creed at Mass. Worn out by his many activities in the cause of Christ, Leander died around 600 and was succeeded in the See ofSeville by his brother Isidore. The Spanish Church honors Leander as the Doctor of the Faith.

from http://www.catholic.org

St. Isidore wrote of his brother: “This man of suave eloquence and eminent talent shone as brightly by his virtues as by his doctrine. By his faith and zeal the Gothic people have been converted from Arianism to the Catholic faith” (De script. eccles., xxviii).

This article is about various theological concepts associated with Arius. For other uses, see Arian.

Arianism is the theological teaching of Arius (ca. AD 250–336), a Christian presbyter from Alexandria, Egypt, concerning the relationship of the entities of the Trinity (‘God the Father’, ‘God the Son’ and ‘God the Holy Spirit’) and the precise nature of the Son of God. Deemed a heretic by the First Council of Nicaea of 325, Arius was later exonerated in 335 at the First Synod of Tyre[1], and then pronounced a heretic again after his death at the First Council of Constantinople of 381.[2] The Roman Emperors Constantius II (337-361) and Valens (364-378) were Arians or Semi-Arians.

Arianism is defined as those teachings attributed to Arius which are in opposition to mainstream Trinitarian Christological dogma, as determined by the first two Ecumenical Councils and currently maintained by theRoman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and most Protestant Churches. “Arianism” is also often used to refer to other nontrinitarian theological systems of the 4th century, which regarded Jesus Christ—the Son of God, the Logos—as either a created being (as in Arianism proper and Anomoeanism), or as neither uncreated nor created in the sense other beings are created (as in Semi-Arianism).

OK now we’re getting somewhere I’m going to have to digress here and start a whole new post on the Arian controversy and the origins of Christianity

hopefully St. Isidore will help me figure this one out